Skip to main navigation Skip to main content

The Needle's Eye

Passing through Youth
Fanny Howe
The Needle’s Eye: Passing through Youth is a sequence of essays, short tales, and lyrics that are intertwined by an inner visual logic. The book contains filmic images that subvert the usual narrative chronology; it is focused on the theme of youth, doomed or saved. A fourteenth-century folktale of two boys who set out to find happiness, the story of Francis and Clare with their revolutionary visions, the Tsarnaev brothers of Boston, the poet George Oppen and the philosopher Simone Weil, two strangers who loved but remain strange, and the wild-child Brigid of Ireland: all these emerge “from multiple directions, but always finally from the eye at the end.” As the philosopher Richard Kearney writes, “Howe’s ruminations and aesthetics are those of the fragmentary, but are unified by world thinkers like Arendt, Weil, Agamben, and Yeats.” The Needle’s Eye is a brilliant and deeply felt exploration of faith and terror, coincidence and perception, by a literary artist of profound moral intelligence, “recognized as one of the country’s least compromising yet most readable experimentalist writers” (The Boston Globe).

Share Title

$16.00
ISBN
978-1-55597-756-6
Format
Paperback
Publication Date
Pages
144
Trim Size
5.5 x 8.25
A meditation on time, violence, and chance by “one of America’s most dazzling poets” (O, The Oprah Magazine)

About the Author

Fanny  Howe
Credit: Lynn Christoffers
Fanny Howe is the author of more than thirty works of poetry and prose, including The Needle's Eye, Come and See, The Winter Sun: Notes on a Vocation, Radical Love: Five Novels, and The Wedding Dress: Meditations on Word and Life. Her most recent poetry collection, Second Childhood, was a finalist for the 2014 National Book Award, and her fiction was honored as a finalist for the 2015 Man Booker International Prize. She lives in New England.

http://www.fannyhowe.com/
More by author

Praise

  • “[Fanny Howe’s] experimental tales, mixing poetry and prose, offer little miracles of meaning growing from the darkest detritus of our planet.”—Richard Kearney, Los Angeles Review of Books
  • “[The Needle's Eye] possesses a liquid quality. . . . The pleasures of this book are, like many of their subjects, mystical and itinerant, ricocheting and nonlinear.”—Kathleen Rooney, Los Angeles Review of Books
  • “What I have always admired about Howe’s work is its furious resistance against traditional form and how, like every great artist, she brings herself to an indelible pattern of literary thinking and feeling that most resembles her entire being. . . . She is, I think, an American mystic.”The Brooklyn Rail
  • “A slim volume that roams across continents, genres, and centuries to convey that which is so difficult to express.”Kirkus Reviews
     
Back to Table of Contents