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A Little More Human

A Novel
Fiona Maazel
Meet Phil Snyder: new father, nursing assistant at a cutting-edge biotech facility on Staten Island, and all-around decent guy. Trouble is, his life is falling apart. His wife has betrayed him, his job involves experimental surgeries with strange side effects, and his father is hiding early-onset dementia. Phil also has a special talent he doesn’t want to publicize—he’s a mind reader and moonlights as Brainstorm, a costumed superhero. But when Phil wakes up from a blackout drunk and is confronted with photos that seem to show him assaulting an unknown woman, even superpowers won’t help him. Try as he might, Phil can’t remember that night, and so, haunted by the need to know, he mind-reads his way through the lab techs at work, adoring fans at Toy Polloi, and anyone else who gets in his way, in an attempt to determine whether he’s capable of such violence.

A Little More Human, rife with layers of paranoia and conspiracy, questions how well we really know ourselves, showcasing Fiona Maazel at her tragicomic, freewheeling best.

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$16.00
ISBN
978-1-55597-769-6
Format
Paperback
Publication Date
Subject
Pages
360
Trim Size
5.5 x 8.25
A dazzling new novel from the author of the “weird, thrilling, and inimitable” Woke Up Lonely (Marie Claire)

About the Author

Fiona  Maazel
Credit: Nina Katchadourian
Fiona Maazel is the author of the novels A Little More Human, Woke Up Lonely, and Last Last Chance. She is the winner of the 2009 Bard Fiction Prize and a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35 ” honoree. She teaches at Princeton University and lives in Brooklyn.

http://www.fionamaazel.com/
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Praise

  • “Fiona Maazel’s prose is delightfully quirky, insanely amusing and impossible to put down: Once again, she knocks it out of the park with a tale that pulls no punches and looks the borders of genre square in the eyes before tearing it all down.”Newsweek
  • “[Fiona Maazel is] a dazzling prose stylist with a gift for creating characters caught in extraordinary situations that defy credulity. Imagine a situation comedy written by Phillip K. Dick or a telenovela penned by Thomas Pynchon.”Los Angeles Times
  • “Fiona Maazel collapses a whirlwind of genres into a tragicomic tromp through memory and mind.”GQ
  • “‘Tempest’-like plots are hatched and mysteries surface. Washing up in a boat graveyard is a body that newspapers call ‘the Swimmer.’ (To identify him, characters travel to Denmark, which gives the novel’s conspiracy a Pynchonian multinational quality.) The brain-damaged patients in the Snyder Center present the kind of cognitive idiosyncrasies reported by Oliver Sacks. . . . This is, in other words, an unquestionably brainy book.”The New York Times Book Review
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